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Posts Tagged ‘resume’

Layoffs and Overqualified Workers: How to Rebound and Not Be Overlooked

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

By Andrea C. Santiago

If you are an experienced or mature professional who has been laid off, finding that next job opportunity can be incredibly challenging, even disheartening at times.

According to the AARP, as of June 2012, jobless people who were 55 and older had been unemployed for almost 56 weeks, compared with an average of 38 weeks for all age groups. However, in some industries, people as young as 30 and 40 are considered “older.”

There is no easy answer for job seekers who are later in their careers. However, if you remain positive, active, and focused in your search, there are many things you can do to be the one who does get the job.

Stay Positive and Open-minded:  Focus on positive aspects of your life, whether they are health-, family-, faith-, or skill-related, etc.

Don’t focus on your age or your employment status, but instead focus on your experience, skill set, and everything you bring to a company.  Remain open-minded about your future—it may not look like you had imagined it would, but change can be good. You will work again, but your new career may be in a different industry, or may not pay as high as your last job. You may want to consider self-employment, or contracting your skills out independently.

Tap into Your Network: Your friends and loved ones know your capabilities better than anyone, and they don’t care what age you are. Be sure to include people from all generations in your network. The entry level associate you worked with 10 years ago who was 15 years your junior may now be a hiring manager. The most successful job seekers are those who maintain professional and personal contacts with a variety of people, and they network whether they are employed or unemployed.

Streamline Your Resume:  Maintain multiple versions of your resume based on the job to which you’re applying. One resume should be for jobs within your industry, while other versions of your resume would be for lower level positions, or ones outside your current industry.

Be honest without completely giving away your age or level of experience. To avoid being immediately dismissed for being overqualified, play down high-level management experience when applying for lower level jobs.  Also, don’t list your entire work history back to college or high school graduation. Fifteen years of work experience should suffice, unless there is something in your earlier career that you feel would help you get the job. Also, you don’t have to list the year you obtained your degree, if you feel that it would give away your age.

Look Your Best: At any age, your appearance is important when interviewing. Your image makes a strong first impression on the interviewer and can significantly impact the outcome of your interview.  For older workers, you want to be age-appropriate, not outdated, or trying to be too trendy.

Dress professionally and in classic styles. A tailored suit, pants, or skirt will make you look your best. Small efforts can make a huge impact – updating your hair color and cut, whitening your teeth, and taking care of your skin can go a long way in helping you look your best.

If possible, exercise and eat healthy foods. As we age, bad personal habits take a greater toll on our appearance. If you come into the interview looking tired or out of shape, it will age you. Being fit helps you look and feel younger, and you will have more energy, which will help you to perform better in the interview.

Learn New Tricks: You undoubtedly possess a lot of knowledge from many years of experience. However, new technology, trends, and research may have impacted your field immensely since you last were on the job market. Be sure you are up to date by staying involved in your appropriate professional associations, continuing education credits, and industry news groups.

Target Growing, Industries That Are in High Demand: If you have 20 years invested in a dying industry, it may be time to consider a career change, or transition to another industry altogether. It’s difficult but necessary in certain circumstances. You may even have to take a few classes to learn the new field, but if you sell your transferable skills and make an effort to network in the field where you want to work, you can make headway into a new industry.

You Applied for the Job…Now What?

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

By Andrea Santiago

Some of the most common job search questions often involve how job seekers should follow up with a potential employer or hiring manager after submitting a resume for consideration.

Many career experts, including Lindsay Olson from US News & World Report’s Money/Careers blog, agree that how you follow up depends upon a number of variables, and you need to approach each situation individually.

However, there are several common denominators that apply to most circumstances, and these guidelines will help you navigate the next step after you have submitted your resume.

The best resume follow-up strategy is to submit such a fantastic resume that you don’t have to follow up. If your resume is spot-on for the position, the hiring authority may contact you first, before you even have to follow up on anything.

So how do you impress hiring managers with your resume?

Customize your resume – Pay close attention to the language used in the job ad and job description. Incorporate the potential employer’s words and key phrases into your own resume where applicable (while being true to your qualifications of course!).

Research Resume Samples – There are numerous websites that now provide resume samples and resume builders for a variety of industries. Check out ResumeHUB in particular to see tons of samples as you walk through the resume creation wizard to craft a professional resume that stands out and showcases your experience.

What if I haven’t heard back?

But even the best resumes will sometimes still require you to proactively reach out to the hiring authority to get feedback regarding your application and status. If your resume does not stop the hiring manager in her or his tracks to invite you to an interview, it doesn’t mean that you are not qualified. The hiring manager may simply be overwhelmed with many good applicants. You can draw additional attention to your resume and help yourself stand out if you are able to follow up effectively and professionally.

How you proceed depends upon the method of your application. Did you apply online, through a friend, via a job fair, or the old fashioned way with a snail-mailed hard copy? Use the same method when possible: ask your friend to ask around for you, send an email, or leave a voicemail. If you know someone in the organization, it may be acceptable to contact that person directly. You should be careful not to contact the wrong person or follow up too frequently.

Here are a few basic resume follow-up tips:

  • Be courteous and respectful of the person’s time.
  • Don’t stalk the hiring manager or over-communicate. You could come across as desperate or just annoy the hiring manager so much that they could rule you out based on your communication style. A good rule to abide by is no more than once a week, for 2-3 weeks.
  • Don’t go above or around the hiring manager or contact listed on the job ad. Some career experts recommend it, but in my experience as a recruiter and a hiring manager, that tactic usually does more harm than good.
  • Your follow up should be brief, well-written, (or well-spoken if you’re leaving a voicemail), and free of errors, typos, or grammar mistakes.
  • Email is less intrusive and generally more accepted than phone calls.

If you follow those basic guidelines when following up on your resume or job application, you will convey a high level of interest, tenacity, and professionalism that employers want from their prospective employees.

Recent Grads: 4 Steps to Master Your Job Search Skills

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

by Heather R. Huhman

Most recent graduates embark on the world of job searching without much formal knowledge of how to land an entry-level job–but mastering job search skills doesn’t have to be as difficult as it is sometimes made out to be.

Here are four steps recent grads should take to launch their job hunt:

Step #1: Evaluate yourself. Much of your job search success will depend on how well you know yourself—your interests, skills, personality, values, goals, etc. This helps you determine what exactly you want in a job and how you might fit in to different company cultures, which are crucial to the process of guiding you to the right type of job.

How? Think back to things your parents, teachers, and professors said you were good at—what are your strengths? What do you truly enjoy doing? What skills make you unique? How do those skills relate to a potential position? Write these down and closely compare job opportunities with your strengths and values.

Step #2: Get networking. Most recent grads have no problems using social networking tools, but there’s more to networking than making connections online. Networking in real life—at events, meetups, and conferences—is something you can master with time and practice. Plus, in-person connections are often stronger and more beneficial to your career.

How? Keep a lookout for conferences and events related to your industry. Attend as many professional networking opportunities as possible. Step outside of your comfort zone in order to make personal connections and follow up with people you meet.

Step #3: Sharpen your writing skills. Knowing how to write is a crucial skill for a number of reasons. First of all, your resume and cover letter are often the first impression you will make on an employer; yout writing determines how you come across on these initial documents. Your job search will also require you to rewrite these documents a number of times for different purposes. Stellar written communication skills are necessary for a majority of fields—from marketing and education to engineering and public relations. It’s particularly important in today’s job market since a lot of companies are turning to virtual and remote workers today to cut costs.

How? Practice, practice, practice. Start a blog and write on topics of interest relating to your industry. Tailor every resume and cover letter to the job opening until it becomes second nature.

Step #4: Practice interviewing. Interviewing effectively is something every job seeker must master. As a recent grad, you must take every interview opportunity to become more comfortable speaking about yourself.

How? The career services center at your alma mater can provide the opportunity to mock interview, but you can also set up informational interviews with professionals in your field to develop your skills and get real feedback.

What other steps should recent graduates take to master their job search skills?

How to Format a Cover Letter

Friday, May 4th, 2012

By Miriam Salpeter

Once job seekers compose a strong, targeted resume, the next important step is to write a cover letter to help enhance their chances to land an interview. Sometimes, it’s difficult to know exactly what to include in the cover letter, or if it should be excessively formal or focus on connecting personally with the reader. The best tips: be sure the cover letter addresses the hiring manager’s needs (as detailed in the job description) and doesn’t include any mistakes to cause the reader to question your ability to do the job—for example, if you say you are detail oriented, but have misspellings in your letter.

It’s important to craft a well-written note, but never rely on the cover letter alone to tell your story. Be sure to include all pertinent information in the resume, including why you are well-qualified, and any discrepancies, including short job stints, job hopping, etc. The cover letter supports your resume, but the resume needs to do all of the heavy lifting, since many hiring managers will only look at you cover letter if they believe your resume makes the cut.

Quint Careers reports, “Studies over the past several years suggest that somewhere between a third and half of hiring decision-makers do not read the letters.” Despite this statistic, hiring managers who expect a cover letter will penalize you for not including it, so your best bet is to write a strong letter to accompany your resume.

What should you include in your cover letter? It’s important to be clear about the job of interest, but it’s boring and a little old-fashioned to start a letter, “I’m writing to apply for the XYZ job, as advertised on ABC.” Start your letter with a “hook” to show a little personality and enthusiasm for the job. This could include a sentence or two to help demonstrate a connection between the organization and you. For example, if applying to Home Depot, “Every weekend when I was growing up, my dad and I donned orange aprons and planned out our Home Depot runs to get materials for our home improvement projects. As a life-long customer, it’s exciting to think about using my finance and accounting skills to work at Home Depot as a Finance Analyst.”

Your letter’s content should not simply repeat the information in your resume; use this as an opportunity to briefly share details an employer might want to know about you. Quint Careers’s research includes an employer “wish list” for cover letters. They want to know (succinctly):

  • How did you find this position? Did someone refer you (always include this information), or did you meet the hiring manager at an event?
  • Why are you applying? Why are you qualified?
  • What do you know about the company? If you’ve done research about the company or organization, demonstrate it in the cover letter.

Other important aspects to incorporate:

  • Strong writing skills; your cover letter is a de facto writing sample.
  • Easy-to-read formatting, including bullet points and white space, and keep it to one page. When you apply by email, your cover letter is the body of the email with your resume attached.
  • Details from the job description; make a direct connection between your skills and their needs.
  • Tailored content; make sure the letter does not seem generic or as if it was written for any audience.

Format your cover letter with the following information:

  • An introduction, including the “hook” or story mentioned above and the name of the job you’re applying for.
  • Several paragraphs outlining your qualifications. Consider pulling out three main points (umbrella topics) from the job description and use each one as the basis of a paragraph describing your qualifications. Make a point to indicate anything unique or special about you that would help make you most qualified for the job.
  • A concluding paragraph indicating when you plan to follow up and suggesting your availability. For example, if you are an out-of-town candidate, you may add, “I will be in the Boston area early next month, and hope to have an opportunity to meet you then. I will be in touch the week of ___________ to follow up if I don’t hear from you sooner.”

A strong cover letter may make the difference. Don’t underestimate this important job-search step.

What Makes a Good Cover Letter?

Friday, May 4th, 2012

By Alison Green

At a time when most job seekers are wondering how to stand out in a crowded field of applicants, too many are overlooking one of the most effective ways to grab an employer’s attention: the cover letter.

Cover letters customized for the job are a powerful opportunity to make a compelling case for yourself as a candidate, totally aside from what’s in your resume. That because for most jobs, picking the best candidate is rarely solely about skills and experience. Those obviously take center stage, but if that’s all that mattered, there would be no point in interviews; employers would make a hire based off of resumes alone. But in the real world, other factors matter too—people skills, intellect, communication abilities, enthusiasm for the job, and your personality. A good cover letter effectively conveys those qualities.

A good cover letter also does the following:

  • It shows personal interest in working for a particular organization and in a particular job, which makes it both more believable and more compelling. People respond when they feel a personal interest from you.
  • It engages the reader in a conversational tone; it’s not stiff or overly formal.
  • Perhaps most importantly, it provides information about the writer that will never be available from a resume—personal traits and work habits.

What a good cover letter doesn’t do is simply summarize the resume that follows. After all, with such limited initial contact, you’re doing yourself a disservice if you squander a whole page of your application on repeating the contents of the other pages. Instead, a great cover letter will provide a whole different type of information. For instance, if you’re applying for a secretarial job that requires top-notch organizational skills, and you’re so neurotically organized that you alphabetize your spices and color-code your bills every month, most hiring managers would love to know that about you. And that’s not something you’d ever put in your resume, but the cover letter is a perfect place for it.

Approaching your cover letter in this way practically guarantees that you’ll stand out from your competition because only a tiny fraction of candidates tailor their cover letters like this. After all, imagine screening resumes and having 200 basically qualified candidates, with little to differentiate them from one another. Wouldn’t you give an extra look at the one person who expressed a genuine enthusiasm for your company and didn’t just send you a generic form letter?

This approach does take longer than sending out the same form letter over and over, but a well-written cover letter that’s individualized to a specific opening is going to open doors when your resume alone might not have. These account for such a tiny fraction of applications that you’ll stand out and immediately go to the top of many hiring managers’ piles. Because of that, it’s likely you’ll find that five truly personalized, well-tailored applications will get you better results than 30 generic applications.

Now, there are certainly some hiring managers out there who will tell you that they don’t care that much about cover letters. But there are so many who do, so it’s well worth your effort to stand out in a crowded field.

Today’s Resume: What You Need to Know

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

By Louise Kursmark

If you’re looking for a job in 2012, you still need a resume. Despite online applications, online profiles, and online social networks connecting you to your next opportunity, the resume remains essential.

But that doesn’t mean the resume hasn’t changed with the times. Here’s what you need to know about today’s resume:

  • It’s shorter. Keep it to one or two pages maximum, no matter how much experience you have. Students and new grads most often will have a one-page resume, although two pages is not out of the question if you have that much relevant material.
  • It’s crisper. Think more white space, shorter paragraphs, less density. It needs to be written and designed so that it can be quickly skimmed for pertinent information.
  • It’s well organized, with clearly labeled sections pointing out relevant information. Add to the “skimmability” factor of your resume by segmenting the information into logical sections and labeling each with a heading—Experience and Education sections, of course, but other sections as well—perhaps Technical Skills, International Experiences, Travel and Languages, Core Skills, and others that are pertinent to you and your qualifications.
  • It’s less fluff, more facts. Don’t take up space telling readers how “excellent” your communication skills are or about your “business acumen.” Focus on the things that will help them decide if you are a viable candidate: Who are you? What do you know and what can you do? Where have you been and what have you accomplished? Your personal attributes become important later in the interview process.
  • It might point to richer, more detailed information. If you have a LinkedIn profile (and you should), insert the link at the top of your resume with your other contact information. Similarly, if you have a personal website, an online portfolio, a blog, or other information that expands on who you are for potential employers, by all means, add the links to your resume. Make it easy for employers to find out more—if they want to.
  • It includes one email address and one phone number. Gone are the days when it was standard form to include home, work, and cell numbers on your resume and perhaps two different email addresses. Make it easy for employers to contact you by listing just one number (for most people, a cell number) and one email address. Then be certain to read and listen to all messages and respond promptly when contacted.
  • It is customized to every job application. In many cases, you’ll be submitting your resume in response to online postings. To rise to the top of a crowded field, your resume must include all the right keywords for a particular position, so carefully review and edit your resume as necessary to match as many keywords as you legitimately can. Without the right keywords and keyword phrases, your resume will never be selected.

Yes, your resume is essential! In combination with a targeted job search with networking as a core strategy, your resume is a centerpiece for making your next career move. Make sure yours is current with the times and positions you to beat out the competition.

Publishing Your Resume

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

By Wendy S. Enelow

Publishing your resume so it’s visible to hundreds, even thousands, of prospective employers and recruiters is just as important to the success of your job search as the actual process of writing the resume. Once it’s written, formatted, and proofread, you’re ready to upload, post, store, track, send, and otherwise distribute it in as many ways as possible to reach your target market.

To help with that challenge, here are some insider secrets about resumes, resume publishing, and job search. This is important information if you want to capture the attention of hiring managers in today’s remarkably competitive online employment market.

Starting with the basics, appreciate that there are two sides of resume publishing—online and offline—each with unique requirements. Believe it or not, there are people who still print and distribute hard copies of their resumes. Why? Because face-to-face networking and job search is still the most effective tactic and should continue to be part of your overall search strategy.

When publishing your offline resume, be certain that it is sharp, conservatively distinctive, and designed to stand out from the crowd. With paper resumes, you can use a distinctive font and add lines, charts, graphics, and other visual characteristics that give your resume depth and character. Publish a resume that doesn’t look like everyone else’s and you’ll give yourself an instantly competitive advantage.

Now let’s discuss the online resume that can take several forms. First, you’ll have the document version that is basically the same as your offline resume. The only difference might be how it looks on someone else’s computer or in a database. You have no control over that, other than to make sure you use a universal font (e.g., Arial, Arial Narrow, Bookman, Garamond, Georgia, Tahoma, Verdana) that translates well from one system to another and hope that your graphic elements come through as intended.

This is one of the reasons why .pdf files are great for resume publishing. Once you’ve saved your document as a .pdf, you’ve ensured that the integrity of the design, style, and format will remain intact. The only downside is that most recruiters and hiring managers will want your resume in either a Microsoft Word or text file so it can be easily uploaded into their candidate database for keyword searches using their applicant tracking system (ATS).

Unfortunately, the vast majority of your online resumes will be in text files that you upload into employment databases and post on job boards. I say unfortunately because those unadorned text files do nothing to give one candidate a visually competitive edge over another. At that point, you must rely 100% on the content—and keywords—in your resume because those are the primary criteria used for candidate selection. If you are called in for an interview, bring in a hard copy of your styled resume that the employer will remember.

With each passing day, the technology underlying resume databases is becoming more sophisticated and flexible. It won’t be long before the majority of companies will allow you to upload published Word resumes, giving you the best of both worlds—the vast online resume publishing and resume distribution options, and the sharp, distinctive visual presentation of a well-designed and well-formatted resume.

Resume Dos and Don’ts

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Resume writers like to say there are no rules in resume writing. That may be true, but it certainly doesn’t help the average job seeker just looking for some good advice!

Rather than worry about a specific formula for writing a great resume, use the following general guidelines to prepare a resume that reflects your unique background and qualifications.

DO get to the point. You can’t tell your entire career history in one or two pages, so concentrate on the things that employers really want to know: who you are, where you have been, and what you have done. Stripping away unnecessary information is the best way to call attention to what is important.

DO focus on your accomplishments. Most individuals reading your resume are familiar with the typical tasks for people with your job titles, so you don’t need to detail everything you do every day. Instead, tell them what you did that made a difference to your company, colleagues, or customers. This will make your resume more interesting, memorable, and unique.

DO include keywords. Resumes today are routinely scanned by electronic systems that are looking for the right “keywords”—the words and phrases that match the job description and the employer’s requirements. Make sure they’ll be found in your resume! Use job postings as your source for the right keywords for your profession and industry.

DON’T make it hard to read. Even if your resume is initially scanned by a computer, at some point it will be reviewed by humans. You can make their job easier by the way you format and present your information. Don’t write in dense, wordy paragraphs. Don’t use long lists of bullet points with nothing to distinguish one from another. Don’t use a tiny font size. Do include white space to let your resume “breathe.”

DON’T forget to proofread. Recruiters and employers routinely cite “errors in the resume” as the reason for not considering a candidate. Errors send the message that you are sloppy and careless when doing important work. Either that, or you don’t know better. So don’t send that message. Proofread your resume several times and ask a friend or colleague proofread it as well.

DON’T expect your resume to get you a job. The resume is just one piece of the job-search puzzle. Don’t neglect other important pieces: networking, directly approaching companies, researching companies and industries, preparing for interviews, and so much more. The resume, when well written and used properly, can help open doors for you—but it can’t do it all.

Job Fairs: How To Make Them Worthwhile

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

By Louise Kursmark, Master Resume Writer

Job seekers flock to career fairs like bees to a hive—and why not? They are a central source of potential employment and networking opportunities with multiple employers in your community. So while you’re job hunting, make it a point to look for and attend job fairs—and follow these tips to make the event a worthwhile investment of your time.

1. Do your homework. Contact the organization running the job fair and ask for a list of companies that will be attending. Research those companies and choose 5 – 8 as your “prime targets” for the job fair. Be prepared, though, that the advance list is not the final—some of your target companies might not be present and others that you haven’t researched will be. So be prepared to change your plan of attack once you are on site. Here’s some great advice and resources for company research!

2. Get your resume ready. Job fair recruiters will look at literally hundreds of resumes in a day. Try to make yours visually distinctive while remaining professional, and write interesting and unique content! Proofread your resume very carefully and have someone else read it as well. Bring several dozen copies with you to the job fair, encased in a portfolio so they stay fresh all day.

3. Dress for success. Wear the same clothing you would for an important interview. Your goal is to present a great image and impress the recruiters with your professionalism. Check out guidelines for job fair and interview attire

4. Start with your target companies. When you arrive at the job fair, review the attendee list (remember, it probably won’t exactly match the original!). Highlight the locations of your target companies and approach them right away. Then you can pursue other companies—secondary targets, new targets, or any other company that sounds interesting.

If your target companies are very popular, be prepared to wait or circle back when the booth is less busy.

5. Be ready with your introduction. Do you have a 2- or 3-sentence introduction of who you are, what you’re looking for, and why you’re valuable? If not, you’ll feel tongue-tied and awkward at the job fair, you’ll look unprepared, and you’ll waste an opportunity to make a great first impression. Explore ideas and scripts to jump-start your preparation

6. Use your company research. As the final sentence of your introduction, add something that relates to what you learned about the company from your research—or something you know or have surmised. For example, “I was reading that XYZ plans to expand into Russia. That sounds interesting and a fit with my background—I was a Russian minor in college and have studied Russian history extensively.” Companies like to know that you are targeting them specifically and that you know something about them, so acquire some knowledge and use it to your advantage.

7. Prepare for the next step. It’s unlikely that you’ll have an in-depth interview at the job fair. Your goal is to make a good impression, establish potential interest, leave your resume, and capture contact information. Get the business card of each recruiter or write down their name, job title, phone number, and email address.

8. Follow up. Of course it would be great if you started getting phone calls right after the job fair! But don’t sit around waiting. Reach out to every person you spoke with. Send a professional email with details about positions you’re interested in. Personalize your note by saying something positive about the company. Attach another copy of your resume. Keep track of all of your contacts and conversations, and follow each one through to the final stage—whether it’s a “not interested” message or, ultimately, a job offer!

You Applied for the Job… Now What?

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

By Andrea Santiago

Some of the most common job search questions often involve the method job seekers should utilize to follow up with a potential employer or hiring manager after submitting a resume to a potential employer for consideration.
Many career experts, including Lindsay Olson from US News & World Report’s Money/Careers blog, agree that how you follow up depends upon a number of variables, and you need to approach each situation accordingly.
However, there are several common denominators that apply to most circumstances, and these guidelines will help you when you’re trying to navigate the job search process after you have submitted your resume.
The best resume follow-up strategy is to submit such a fantastic resume that you don’t have to follow up. If your resume is spot-on for the position, the hiring authority may contact you first, before you even have to follow up on anything.
So how do you “wow” hiring managers with your resume?
Customize your resume – Pay close attention to the verbiage used in the job ad and job description. Incorporate the potential employer’s words and key phrases into your own resume, (where applicable of course—true to your qualifications of course!)

Research Resume Samples – There are numerous websites that now provide resume samples and resume builders for a variety of industries.

There are many ways to create an attention-grabbing resume. But even the best resumes will still require you to proactively reach out to the hiring authority to get feedback regarding your application and status. If your resume does not stop the hiring manager in his or her tracks, and you don’t receive a call from anyone inviting you to an interview, it doesn’t mean that you are not qualified. The hiring manager may simply be overwhelmed with many good applicants. Sometimes, you can draw additional attention to your resume and help yourself stand out over the other applicants if you are able to follow up effectively and professionally.

How you proceed depends upon the circumstances of your application. Did you apply online, through a friend, via a job fair, or some other method? If you know someone in the organization, it may be acceptable to contact that person directly. Otherwise, you should be careful not to contact the wrong person, or follow up too frequently. Below are a few basic resume follow-up tips that apply to most situations:

  • Be courteous and respectful of the person’s time.
  • Don’t stalk the hiring manager or over-communicate. You could come across as desperate, or you may just annoy the hiring manager so much that they could rule you out based on that. A good rule of thumb is no more than 1-2 times per week, for 2-3 weeks.
  • Don’t go above or around the hiring manager or contact listed on the job ad. Some career experts recommend it, but in my experience as a recruiter, and as a hiring manager, that tactic usually does more harm than good.
  • Your follow up should be brief, well-written, (or well-spoken if you’re leaving a voicemail), and free of errors, typos, or grammar mistakes.
  • Email is less intrusive and generally more accepted than phone calls.

If you follow those basic guidelines when following up on your resume or job application, you will convey a high level of interest, tenacity, and professionalism that employers want from their prospective employees.