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Posts Tagged ‘job search tips’

10 Tips to Build the Perfect Resume

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

By Louise Kursmark

What’s a perfect resume? It’s a resume that opens doors, gets you noticed during your job search, attracts interviews, and ultimately gets you hired! While every resume is unique, follow these resume builder tips to make sure that yours is as close to perfect as it can be.

1. Review sample resumes. Don’t copy another person’s resume or try to make your background fit into an arbitrary resume template. But looking at great resume examples will give you ideas, solutions, and inspiration for your own masterpiece.

2. Start with a goal. It’s impossible to write a resume that’s clear, powerful, and sharply focused if you don’t know what kind of job you’re looking for. Decide what you ideally want to do and write a resume for that position. Chances are, it will be perfectly useful for other, similar positions as well.

3. Showcase your success stories. The unique accomplishments that you feature in your resume are what make it unique, interesting, and memorable. Choose achievements that relate to your goal and demonstrate your professional skills.

4. Get organized. We’ve all seen examples of resumes that lack consistency in design, coherence in structure, and clarity in format. Don’t let your resume be one of these bad examples! Organize your material before you write. Arrange similar information in the same way to help your readers understand your background and qualifications.

5. Highlight your job titles. In most cases, the position you held is more meaningful than the company where you worked, so don’t let those good titles get lost on your resume. Bold type, all caps, small caps, or slightly larger types are good options to consider when presenting your job titles.

6. Emphasize what’s important. On the other hand, if all of your experience has been in low-level jobs unrelated to your current career goals, then it doesn’t make sense to highlight those job titles. Instead, call attention to projects you’ve completed, leadership roles you’ve held, volunteer work you’ve done, or other meaningful activities that will let an employer understand the value you offer.

7. Dig deep to find results. Job search today is intensely competitive, and your resume may be all you have to capture attention. You can make your resume stand out by including specific, measurable results of your jobs, projects, and activities. Precise numbers and concrete outcomes will distinguish you from the pack of job seekers who write bland, generic resumes.

8. Be creative. Looking at resume examples and using a resume template builder like ResumeHUB are great ways to get started writing your resume, but don’t be afraid to bend the rules just a bit to make your resume as unique as you are.

9. Take the time to get it right. Employers consider your resume to be an example of your very best work. It’s not something you can dash off at the last minute. Invest the time necessary to produce a top-notch document—write thoroughly, edit extensively, and proofread obsessively.

10. Get help with your resume. No need to go it alone! There are great online tools like ResumeHUB that make creating a professional resume easy. These resume builder programs walk you through each step and provide help for each section of the resume.  Once you have your resume written, ask people you respect for their opinion. Find a mentor in your field who can coach you on resumes, interviewing, job search, and how to get ahead in your career. Most of all, understand that you’re likely to change jobs 10 or more times in your career, so learning now to write the perfect resume will prepare you for every change that’s sure to come in the years ahead.

You Applied for the Job…Now What?

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

By Andrea Santiago

Some of the most common job search questions often involve how job seekers should follow up with a potential employer or hiring manager after submitting a resume for consideration.

Many career experts, including Lindsay Olson from US News & World Report’s Money/Careers blog, agree that how you follow up depends upon a number of variables, and you need to approach each situation individually.

However, there are several common denominators that apply to most circumstances, and these guidelines will help you navigate the next step after you have submitted your resume.

The best resume follow-up strategy is to submit such a fantastic resume that you don’t have to follow up. If your resume is spot-on for the position, the hiring authority may contact you first, before you even have to follow up on anything.

So how do you impress hiring managers with your resume?

Customize your resume – Pay close attention to the language used in the job ad and job description. Incorporate the potential employer’s words and key phrases into your own resume where applicable (while being true to your qualifications of course!).

Research Resume Samples – There are numerous websites that now provide resume samples and resume builders for a variety of industries. Check out ResumeHUB in particular to see tons of samples as you walk through the resume creation wizard to craft a professional resume that stands out and showcases your experience.

What if I haven’t heard back?

But even the best resumes will sometimes still require you to proactively reach out to the hiring authority to get feedback regarding your application and status. If your resume does not stop the hiring manager in her or his tracks to invite you to an interview, it doesn’t mean that you are not qualified. The hiring manager may simply be overwhelmed with many good applicants. You can draw additional attention to your resume and help yourself stand out if you are able to follow up effectively and professionally.

How you proceed depends upon the method of your application. Did you apply online, through a friend, via a job fair, or the old fashioned way with a snail-mailed hard copy? Use the same method when possible: ask your friend to ask around for you, send an email, or leave a voicemail. If you know someone in the organization, it may be acceptable to contact that person directly. You should be careful not to contact the wrong person or follow up too frequently.

Here are a few basic resume follow-up tips:

  • Be courteous and respectful of the person’s time.
  • Don’t stalk the hiring manager or over-communicate. You could come across as desperate or just annoy the hiring manager so much that they could rule you out based on your communication style. A good rule to abide by is no more than once a week, for 2-3 weeks.
  • Don’t go above or around the hiring manager or contact listed on the job ad. Some career experts recommend it, but in my experience as a recruiter and a hiring manager, that tactic usually does more harm than good.
  • Your follow up should be brief, well-written, (or well-spoken if you’re leaving a voicemail), and free of errors, typos, or grammar mistakes.
  • Email is less intrusive and generally more accepted than phone calls.

If you follow those basic guidelines when following up on your resume or job application, you will convey a high level of interest, tenacity, and professionalism that employers want from their prospective employees.

Today’s Resume: What You Need to Know

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

By Louise Kursmark

If you’re looking for a job in 2012, you still need a resume. Despite online applications, online profiles, and online social networks connecting you to your next opportunity, the resume remains essential.

But that doesn’t mean the resume hasn’t changed with the times. Here’s what you need to know about today’s resume:

  • It’s shorter. Keep it to one or two pages maximum, no matter how much experience you have. Students and new grads most often will have a one-page resume, although two pages is not out of the question if you have that much relevant material.
  • It’s crisper. Think more white space, shorter paragraphs, less density. It needs to be written and designed so that it can be quickly skimmed for pertinent information.
  • It’s well organized, with clearly labeled sections pointing out relevant information. Add to the “skimmability” factor of your resume by segmenting the information into logical sections and labeling each with a heading—Experience and Education sections, of course, but other sections as well—perhaps Technical Skills, International Experiences, Travel and Languages, Core Skills, and others that are pertinent to you and your qualifications.
  • It’s less fluff, more facts. Don’t take up space telling readers how “excellent” your communication skills are or about your “business acumen.” Focus on the things that will help them decide if you are a viable candidate: Who are you? What do you know and what can you do? Where have you been and what have you accomplished? Your personal attributes become important later in the interview process.
  • It might point to richer, more detailed information. If you have a LinkedIn profile (and you should), insert the link at the top of your resume with your other contact information. Similarly, if you have a personal website, an online portfolio, a blog, or other information that expands on who you are for potential employers, by all means, add the links to your resume. Make it easy for employers to find out more—if they want to.
  • It includes one email address and one phone number. Gone are the days when it was standard form to include home, work, and cell numbers on your resume and perhaps two different email addresses. Make it easy for employers to contact you by listing just one number (for most people, a cell number) and one email address. Then be certain to read and listen to all messages and respond promptly when contacted.
  • It is customized to every job application. In many cases, you’ll be submitting your resume in response to online postings. To rise to the top of a crowded field, your resume must include all the right keywords for a particular position, so carefully review and edit your resume as necessary to match as many keywords as you legitimately can. Without the right keywords and keyword phrases, your resume will never be selected.

Yes, your resume is essential! In combination with a targeted job search with networking as a core strategy, your resume is a centerpiece for making your next career move. Make sure yours is current with the times and positions you to beat out the competition.

Publishing Your Resume

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

By Wendy S. Enelow

Publishing your resume so it’s visible to hundreds, even thousands, of prospective employers and recruiters is just as important to the success of your job search as the actual process of writing the resume. Once it’s written, formatted, and proofread, you’re ready to upload, post, store, track, send, and otherwise distribute it in as many ways as possible to reach your target market.

To help with that challenge, here are some insider secrets about resumes, resume publishing, and job search. This is important information if you want to capture the attention of hiring managers in today’s remarkably competitive online employment market.

Starting with the basics, appreciate that there are two sides of resume publishing—online and offline—each with unique requirements. Believe it or not, there are people who still print and distribute hard copies of their resumes. Why? Because face-to-face networking and job search is still the most effective tactic and should continue to be part of your overall search strategy.

When publishing your offline resume, be certain that it is sharp, conservatively distinctive, and designed to stand out from the crowd. With paper resumes, you can use a distinctive font and add lines, charts, graphics, and other visual characteristics that give your resume depth and character. Publish a resume that doesn’t look like everyone else’s and you’ll give yourself an instantly competitive advantage.

Now let’s discuss the online resume that can take several forms. First, you’ll have the document version that is basically the same as your offline resume. The only difference might be how it looks on someone else’s computer or in a database. You have no control over that, other than to make sure you use a universal font (e.g., Arial, Arial Narrow, Bookman, Garamond, Georgia, Tahoma, Verdana) that translates well from one system to another and hope that your graphic elements come through as intended.

This is one of the reasons why .pdf files are great for resume publishing. Once you’ve saved your document as a .pdf, you’ve ensured that the integrity of the design, style, and format will remain intact. The only downside is that most recruiters and hiring managers will want your resume in either a Microsoft Word or text file so it can be easily uploaded into their candidate database for keyword searches using their applicant tracking system (ATS).

Unfortunately, the vast majority of your online resumes will be in text files that you upload into employment databases and post on job boards. I say unfortunately because those unadorned text files do nothing to give one candidate a visually competitive edge over another. At that point, you must rely 100% on the content—and keywords—in your resume because those are the primary criteria used for candidate selection. If you are called in for an interview, bring in a hard copy of your styled resume that the employer will remember.

With each passing day, the technology underlying resume databases is becoming more sophisticated and flexible. It won’t be long before the majority of companies will allow you to upload published Word resumes, giving you the best of both worlds—the vast online resume publishing and resume distribution options, and the sharp, distinctive visual presentation of a well-designed and well-formatted resume.

Reference Dos and Don’ts

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

By Miriam Salpeter

Job seekers preparing for the interview process often fail to look to the next stage of the job search process: references. It’s not a good idea to ignore this crucial step until the last minute, as you must rely on people you may not see regularly, and whose schedules you don’t know, to help seal a job offer. Prepare appropriate professional references in advance and save yourself a lot of aggravation when an employer requests them on short notice.

DON’T forget to prepare in advance. Identify previous employers (or your current employer, if he or she knows about your search), colleagues, clients, and others who are qualified to speak about your professional skills and accomplishments. Students who recently graduated may consider asking professors. Anyone with a significant volunteer role may wish to ask the supervisor in charge of that project to serve as a reference.

DO ask people for permission to give their names as references. Contact those people and ask if they will be able to provide a strong reference. If you’ve changed career directions, make sure to provide a brief explanation of your decision and remind the reference about the transferable skills you used when working with them that still support your goals today.

For example, if you were a teacher, and now are pursuing a management position in a retail setting, you may wish to remind your former supervisor about leadership roles you took and the fact that your classroom management skills are relevant to your targeted job.

DON’T provide a name if the reference seemed to hesitate or hedge. You have nothing to gain from trying to convince someone to serve as a reference if it could hurt more than help you. The best references are those who are enthusiastically supportive and seem happy to be asked.

DO prepare your references. Provide updated information about your work history, including your current resume and links to your online profiles, especially your LinkedIn, blog, or personal Web site if you have one.

DON’T forget to keep in touch with references to let them know to expect a call. This gives you a chance to fill them in about the company and to share details about the job description and how the interview went.

DO offer suggestions of topics they may want to emphasize when serving as a reference. You do not need to tell the reference what to say, but it is appropriate to provide details to help them to be a strong advocate. When I was applying for one of my jobs, I knew that teamwork and the willingness to pitch in when necessary were crucial for my potential employer. I emphasized how I was the perfect match in the interview. I also asked my then- supervisor (who knew about my search and was my number one reference) if she could mention some examples of my teamwork when she spoke to my potential boss, who offered me the job as soon as he spoke to her.

DON’T forget to thank your references for supporting you. Maintain strong relationships and write notes acknowledging their time and effort. Be sure to let them know if you took the job, and if not, why not.

Remember, keep your hand in every aspect of the job search to steer your career successfully.

Resume Dos and Don’ts

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Resume writers like to say there are no rules in resume writing. That may be true, but it certainly doesn’t help the average job seeker just looking for some good advice!

Rather than worry about a specific formula for writing a great resume, use the following general guidelines to prepare a resume that reflects your unique background and qualifications.

DO get to the point. You can’t tell your entire career history in one or two pages, so concentrate on the things that employers really want to know: who you are, where you have been, and what you have done. Stripping away unnecessary information is the best way to call attention to what is important.

DO focus on your accomplishments. Most individuals reading your resume are familiar with the typical tasks for people with your job titles, so you don’t need to detail everything you do every day. Instead, tell them what you did that made a difference to your company, colleagues, or customers. This will make your resume more interesting, memorable, and unique.

DO include keywords. Resumes today are routinely scanned by electronic systems that are looking for the right “keywords”—the words and phrases that match the job description and the employer’s requirements. Make sure they’ll be found in your resume! Use job postings as your source for the right keywords for your profession and industry.

DON’T make it hard to read. Even if your resume is initially scanned by a computer, at some point it will be reviewed by humans. You can make their job easier by the way you format and present your information. Don’t write in dense, wordy paragraphs. Don’t use long lists of bullet points with nothing to distinguish one from another. Don’t use a tiny font size. Do include white space to let your resume “breathe.”

DON’T forget to proofread. Recruiters and employers routinely cite “errors in the resume” as the reason for not considering a candidate. Errors send the message that you are sloppy and careless when doing important work. Either that, or you don’t know better. So don’t send that message. Proofread your resume several times and ask a friend or colleague proofread it as well.

DON’T expect your resume to get you a job. The resume is just one piece of the job-search puzzle. Don’t neglect other important pieces: networking, directly approaching companies, researching companies and industries, preparing for interviews, and so much more. The resume, when well written and used properly, can help open doors for you—but it can’t do it all.

How to Target Your Search to Land an Internship or Job

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

Looking for an internship or job can be a difficult task. With all of the online tools available to you as a job seeker—job boards, niche industry websites, social media networks, online resume sites—where should you begin your search?

It can be overwhelming to start from scratch, but that’s where a target comes in handy. A target is defined as: “a person, object, or place selected as the aim of an attack.” While you’re obviously not attacking anyone in your job search, you should be aiming your job search efforts toward something specific during your job hunt. 

Here are a few ways to target your search:

Search for companies instead of jobs. Although it can be easy to fall into the trap of simply searching for any job in your field, you should instead focus on specific companies for which you’d like to work. You’ll be able to determine if their cultures and values meet your expectations at the beginning of the application process.

Follow your targeted companies on social media. Learn more about a potential employer by reading the organization’s blog, Twitter feed, Facebook page updates and other online (and offline) content. Look for key individuals who already work at the company with whom you can connect via social media channels. Leave thoughtful comments or ask great questions on their Web content to help current employees get to know you before you apply. Building these relationships first can help give you a great advantage when applying for an open job. 

Create a job search plan. How much time do you plan to spend each day on job searching? What about on social networks, creating a portfolio, or blogging? Decide how you’ll spend your hours in the day to land your job or internship. Consider each task and set the amount of time you’ll spend on it so your efforts are as focused as possible. It can be easy to get sucked into the “Internet black hole” when searching for job openings; having a plan minimizes these distractions. And don’t forget the value of offline job hunting—attend networking functions and career fairs, stop into offices and ask for information in person, and ask your friends and acquaintances to keep an ear out for you. Although a job search can easily be a full-time job, you also need to factor in time for your hobbies, exercising, or for any other activity you enjoy. 

Keep your network informed about your job search efforts and goals. Someone you already know may know someone at one of your dream companies. But you’ll never know until you interact with those people already in your network. Talk with these individuals about your search, update them on organizations for which you’ve applied, and make time for people in your network that you can help in some way. Networking is often the tactic that leads to a new job opportunity.

How else can job seekers target their job search to land a new job? Do you have a specific example of something you did that worked?

You Applied for the Job… Now What?

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

By Andrea Santiago

Some of the most common job search questions often involve the method job seekers should utilize to follow up with a potential employer or hiring manager after submitting a resume to a potential employer for consideration.
Many career experts, including Lindsay Olson from US News & World Report’s Money/Careers blog, agree that how you follow up depends upon a number of variables, and you need to approach each situation accordingly.
However, there are several common denominators that apply to most circumstances, and these guidelines will help you when you’re trying to navigate the job search process after you have submitted your resume.
The best resume follow-up strategy is to submit such a fantastic resume that you don’t have to follow up. If your resume is spot-on for the position, the hiring authority may contact you first, before you even have to follow up on anything.
So how do you “wow” hiring managers with your resume?
Customize your resume – Pay close attention to the verbiage used in the job ad and job description. Incorporate the potential employer’s words and key phrases into your own resume, (where applicable of course—true to your qualifications of course!)

Research Resume Samples – There are numerous websites that now provide resume samples and resume builders for a variety of industries.

There are many ways to create an attention-grabbing resume. But even the best resumes will still require you to proactively reach out to the hiring authority to get feedback regarding your application and status. If your resume does not stop the hiring manager in his or her tracks, and you don’t receive a call from anyone inviting you to an interview, it doesn’t mean that you are not qualified. The hiring manager may simply be overwhelmed with many good applicants. Sometimes, you can draw additional attention to your resume and help yourself stand out over the other applicants if you are able to follow up effectively and professionally.

How you proceed depends upon the circumstances of your application. Did you apply online, through a friend, via a job fair, or some other method? If you know someone in the organization, it may be acceptable to contact that person directly. Otherwise, you should be careful not to contact the wrong person, or follow up too frequently. Below are a few basic resume follow-up tips that apply to most situations:

  • Be courteous and respectful of the person’s time.
  • Don’t stalk the hiring manager or over-communicate. You could come across as desperate, or you may just annoy the hiring manager so much that they could rule you out based on that. A good rule of thumb is no more than 1-2 times per week, for 2-3 weeks.
  • Don’t go above or around the hiring manager or contact listed on the job ad. Some career experts recommend it, but in my experience as a recruiter, and as a hiring manager, that tactic usually does more harm than good.
  • Your follow up should be brief, well-written, (or well-spoken if you’re leaving a voicemail), and free of errors, typos, or grammar mistakes.
  • Email is less intrusive and generally more accepted than phone calls.

If you follow those basic guidelines when following up on your resume or job application, you will convey a high level of interest, tenacity, and professionalism that employers want from their prospective employees.

Using Personal Networks to Your Advantage

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

By Miriam Salpeter

Even though job seekers are inundated with advice to use their personal networks to propel job search success, it is not always easy to follow through. Social networking complicates the focus on personal networks, as traditional media constantly shares ways people lose jobs via Facebook and networks like it, without showcasing stories from people who found jobs! With thousands of people joining online networks each day, it’s impossible to ignore these tools when leveraging personal networks for job opportunities. The key for job seekers is knowing how to use in-person and online communities without seeming like a desperate job seeker. Read on for suggestions!
Real, In-Person Networks
Just because social media is so pervasive doesn’t mean job seekers should ignore their in-person networks. Advise job seekers to consider any party as a networking opportunity. This includes backyard barbeques, birthday parties, and professional socials. Job seekers never know where they may meet the perfect contact to provide a professional introduction.

However, it’s important not to parade around these events with a virtual “J” for job hunter on the forehead. No one wants to get stuck talking to someone who seems desperate or needy and who only wants to discuss possible job connections. Important points for job hunters to consider when meeting new people in person:

  • Be a listener first. Make every person feel as if he or she is important and valued. Ask a lot of questions. The goal should be to continue the conversation at a later date. People enjoy and appreciate spending time with people who are good listeners and seem interested in them.
  • Learn some personal details about contacts to make it easy to follow-up and keep in touch. (It’s a good idea to advise job seekers to excuse themselves to jot down some notes after conversations.) For example, take note of the contact’s favorite sports team or hobby. In a month or two, send a note commenting on the team’s progress (if it’s positive!) or forward an article or blog post relevant to the person’s hobby. Doing so helps keep the job seeker top-of-mind and reminds the contact to think about possible networking opportunities for the person.
  • It is important for the job seeker to work something into the conversation relevant to his or her search, but he or she should refrain from actually asking for help during an informal gathering or first meeting. For example, “I’m an enterprise technology HR professional focused on finance. I’m actually seeking a new opportunity, possibly in an Oracle environment.” This statement offers information, but does not ask for anything in return. Most people won’t have a great lead or suggestion off the tops of their heads, anyway. It’s better to ask the new contact to meet for coffee at a later time. Resist asking for anything specific until the follow-up meeting.
  • Always ask new acquaintances if they are willing to connect via LinkedIn. (And then follow up right after the event.)
  • It’s easy to recognize if a contact is amenable to getting together. Follow up immediately with an invitation for coffee or lunch. During the informational meeting, job seekers should be sure to continue to demonstrate expertise, but also make it clear what organizations or individuals they would like to meet and request introductions if possible.
  • If the contact offers to “keep his ears open” for the job seeker after an in-person meeting, it means he doesn’t have enough information to know how to help. In that case, re-state job search objectives and suggest companies of interest. It’s up to the job seeker to be sure contacts know what they can do to help. Don’t leave the results up to chance.

Connecting with online personal networks
In many ways, the “rules” for social networking are the same as in-person networking: listen more than you contribute, don’t ask for something before you build a relationship, and give before you expect to get. Job seekers shouldn’t ignore opportunities to use Facebook, where most of their contacts actually know them! Some advice to help job seekers motivate Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter contacts to help them:

  • Maintain complete profiles on all of the “big three:” LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Incorporate keywords to help readers know what the job seeker knows and how he or she can contribute.
  • Use Facebook and LinkedIn status updates and tweets to illustrate expertise. Job seekers should post updates making it clear they understand their targeted fields. It’s easy to find links and data to post online by searching Google or by setting a Google alert. Another way to keep up-to-date about company information is to follow companies via LinkedIn to source details to share on social networks. For example, if someone wants a job in insurance, he or she should follow news sources for regulatory updates and other useful information to share on Facebook. This helps everyone following the job seeker understand his or her interests and field and may make contacts more likely to think of the person if they learn of appropriate opportunities.
  • Occasionally mention a company of interest via status updates, but constantly referring to a job hunt is counterproductive.
  • Present a totally professional persona, eliminating anything the job seeker wouldn’t want an employer to see. This helps friends and contacts see the job seeker as a potential employee or referral.

5 Ways for Recent College Graduates to Find Available Jobs

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Graduation has come and gone, and another batch of college students now find themselves in the “real world” of job searching. It can be scary, confusing and downright frustrating—especially because many of today’s colleges and universities don’t properly prepare students for their entry-level job search.

You might have a good idea of what you want in your ideal job—but where do you find it? Below are several ways I’d suggest getting started in your job search:

Participate in professional and job seeking communities. Communities are a valuable form of support and advice during a job search. The other participants can also be a great addition to your network. These groups of people exist both online and offline – think social media groups and chats, professional associations, and support groups – and can be a great source of inspiration and information in a job search. Being active and engaging in these groups can make you more visible to those who can help in your job search and allow you to give back with advice of your own.

Follow companies of interest on social media sites. Social media has changed the way organizations hire and source potential candidates, making it easier than ever for a job seeker to connect directly to the company they’d like to work for. Following their official Twitter account, Facebook page or blog feed can help ensure that you’ll be the first to know about potential openings and helps you learn more about the company at hand.

Volunteer or intern at a prospective employer. Although internships are often unpaid, it’s a valuable look inside of a company you desire to work for. During an internship or volunteer position, you’ll get to know employees at the organization all while gaining skills and experience in your field. It’s a great way to prove yourself as a professional and gain an “in” at the company. In fact, many employers look to their intern pool or employee referral list when looking to hire for entry-level positions.

Check major job boards, company career sites and Craigslist. While job listings shouldn’t be the only job search tactic you have in your arsenal, they’re certainly a valuable way to gauge who’s hiring and where. Job and Career Accelerator can help you find up-to-date job listings in hundreds of fields.

Just make sure you don’t spend all your time combing through job listings that might not even land an interview—you should also be networking, preparing your job search documents and polishing your online presence.

Reach out to your personal and professional network. Networking is often the best tactic to finding your next job. Whether it’s because you know someone at a company you’ve applied at and they put in a good word for you, or because a friend refers you to an unadvertised job opening they heard about, don’t forget to network early and often. Hopefully you’ve built a strong network before leaving school (always network before you need something!). Continue meeting new people and reaching out to others you’d like to build a professional relationship with. Remember, networking is a two-way street—you must provide value to your connections, too. Believe me, you have valuable advice and insight to share. Don’t be shy!